Program Suggestions Terry Pauling 2016-12-28 06:00:00Z 0

Like a lot of us, I spent much of my childhood riding bikes, but fell out of the habit for a while. Forty years. Then my wife and I moved to New York, where cyclists risk their necks in a daily Thunderdome of cabs, police cars, firetrucks, double-decker buses, messengers on motorbikes, and delivery trucks backing around corners at 20 miles an hour. Not for me! At least not until my 50th birthday, when my metabolic furnace flamed out. Calories started going directly from beer bottle to beer belly. It was time to start exercising. Either that or give up Samuel Adams, and I couldn’t do that to Sam.

I started on a stationary bike in a gym. Working up a sweat while watching TV, I could see how many calories I was burning: about 200 in a half-hour at a smooth pace, enough to cancel out one beer. I felt stronger and more alert afterward, but there was something unsatisfying about being an aging, balding guy working hard to get nowhere. Call it a midbike crisis – I longed to get outdoors again.

On my 55th birthday, my wife bought me an all-black cruiser with fat tires and wide handlebars. That bike is as indestructible as I feel when I’m on it. Riding around Manhattan, I stuck to bike paths along the Hudson River at first, feeling the wind blowing through where my hair used to be. Little by little I branched out into the city.

I was a late-life convert to a fast-growing trend. “Walking and jogging are awesome, but you cover so much more ground on a bike. There’s no better way to explore a new city or the town where you live,” says Steve Taylor, a spokesman (get it?) for the League of American Bicyclists, a nonprofit group with more than 100,000 members. He calls biking a healthy, environmentally friendly alternative to sitting in a car, “not just for young people or fitness buffs, but for businesspeople who might not have been on a bike since they were kids. It has never been easier for grown-ups to ride, and it’s getting easier every year.”

Each year brings thousands of miles of new bike lanes all over the world. In the United States, programs modeled on those in cities like Paris and Amsterdam are making bike-sharing the Zipcar of human-powered transport. New York’s Citi Bike, the nation’s largest, boasts 100,000 members. Others include Boston’s Hubway and Chicago’s Divvy.

Like most cyclists my age, I’m not out for thrills, chills, or medals. Whenever I’m tempted to race a rider who’s zipping up behind me, I remember the day I spent with Lance Armstrong when he was Tour de France champion. When I asked how he could possibly dominate world-class cyclists who were doping if he wasn’t doping, he gave me an icy look and said, “Hard work. Any other questions?”

I had one. “Any advice for a cyclist my age?”

He looked me over and said, “Don’t fall off.”

I have tried to live by Lance’s advice. Unfortunately, it is practically impossible to ride across the Brooklyn Bridge without running into a tourist. They’re always stepping into the bike lane without warning, smiling for selfies. Later, rubbing Neosporin on my scabs, I console myself by thinking of people all over the globe enjoying photos of their trip to New York, with me as a blur in the background, skidding off my bike.

CULTURE: LIFE IN THE BIKE LANE 2016-12-28 06:00:00Z 0
The Village
Celebrates its 25th Anniversary
Saturday,
 October 1st
2 - 4 p.m.
MapleCrest Hall
 
 
Climate Change and National Security
          Wednesday, October 12th 
   Speaker will be Col. Lawrence Wilkerson
   Col. Wilkerson was Chief of Staff for Secretary of State Colin Powell.
 
  Sponsored by The Indianola Green Team and Simpson College
  Luncheon Reservations at:  
  https://securityandclimate.eventbrite.com
          Free Will Donation
 
Two Locations:
11:30 - 1:00  (Luncheon)
Trinity United Presbyterian Church
 
7:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Simpson College
Black Box Theatre
Kent Student Center

 

 

Below are Links to Community Websites

     

        

      

Community Events 2016-09-27 05:00:00Z 0

Nations around the world observed the International Day of Peace on 21 September, a date designated by the United Nations in 2001 as "a day of global ceasefire and nonviolence."

 Rotary's commitment to building peace and resolving conflict is rooted in the Rotary Peace Centers program, formed in 2002. Each year, the program prepares up to 100 fellows to work for peace through a two-year master's degree program or a three-month professional certificate program at university partners worldwide.

Today, nearly 1,000 peace centers alumni are applying their skills — negotiating peace in conflict areas, drafting legislation to protect exploited children, keeping communities safe through innovative law enforcement tactics, and pursuing many other career paths devoted to peace.

 Click here to Learn how you can support Rotary Peace Centers.

Rotary News

19-Sep-2016
ROTARY MEMBERS LINK LOVE OF BEER, CLEAN WATER CRISIS 2016-09-27 05:00:00Z 0
“Don’t look back.
Give up the what ifs,
the couldas and shouldas.
It’s wasted time you could be using
to move forward and make new and exciting plans.”
Kris Calvert 

http://homeinsteaders.org/#sthash.qa18CW2N.HifCKLSO.dpuf

Thought For The Day Terry Pauling 2016-09-07 05:00:00Z 0
Sadagopan Govindan visited Indianola during the 2016 National Balloon Classic and also visited our club on August 19th. In the process he exchanged one of his Club's banners for one of our Club's 'Rotary T-Shirts'. 
 
Sadagopan  is from the Rotary Club of Chennai IT City (Club No.84442), Rotary International Dist.3230, Chennai, Tamilnadu, India.  He joined in the Rotary Movement during the year 1988 and has served in various posts, such as Club Treasurer, Club Secretary and Club President. He has many Awards at District Level.  His second son is a Rotarian in Rotary Club of Innsbrook (RI Dist.7600), Richmond, Virginia.
 
Sadagopan is an Advocate, which he stated is the same as an attorney in our country.  While in Iowa, he has stayed with his son who lives in West Des Moines.  The family traveled to Chicago and visited Rotary's International Office and met with our current RI President. He plans to attend the Rotary Convention in Atlanta next year and will visit our club again while in Iowa.  
 
Thank you for visiting and we wish you a safe return home next fall.
 
    
 
  
 
  
Visiting Rotarian 2016-08-24 05:00:00Z 0
Climate Change and National Security
          Wednesday, October 12th 
       11:30 a.m.     &       7:00 p.m
   Speaker will be Col. Lawrence Wilkerson
   Col. Wilkerson was Chief of Staff for Secretary of State Colin Powell.
 
  Sponsored by The Indianola Green Team and Simpson College
  Luncheon Reservations at:  
  https://securityandclimate.eventbrite.com
          Free Will Donation
Climate Change and National Security 2016-08-24 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Tom Narak, District Governor Nominee
 
 

The Rotary International Convention is June 10-14 in Atlanta, Georgia, it's also the 100th Anniversary of The Rotary Foundation!  Tens of thousands of people from around the world attend this annual worldwide Rotary event.

ATLANTA IS COMING!
*The best hotels can start to sell out...reserve your room now.
*A promotional registration rate of $340 is available until December.
*Cool stuff like Home Hospitality night is limited, REALLY NEAT to do!
*Go pet a Panda at the Zoo while you are in Atlanta.
*Make lifetime new friends from around the world!
*Have dinner at the world headquarters of Coke one evening.
*Our Foundation is only celebrated as 100 years old once!
*The food ! The Food! The Food! Southern fried everything.
*Temps average in the mid-80's...great weather.

To find information and to REGISTER for the convention, click HEREIf you have questions contact Tom Narak, DGN at tom.carol@msn.com. Celebrate a historic Rotary Anniversary at this convention!

Plan now!

 

2017 Rotary International Convention 2016-08-17 05:00:00Z 0

This Fall's District 6000 Training event; ONE ROTARY SUMMIT joins together Rotary leaders to exchange ideas on energizing and boosting your clubs growth, service and public interaction. 

Rotarians are Leaders!  Engage fresh new thinking and take home hands-on tools to strengthen membership, public image and involvement in Foundation programs.  This is a synergistic learning experience for ALL ROTARIANS! Thursday, September 22, at the Shive-Hattery, Inc. office building from 5:30-9:00 p.m. with a light supper served at 5:30. 

This event is FREE but advanced registration is required to plan for food and sufficient seating.  REGISTER BY MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 20  on the District 6000 Website.  Once logged in, click on the word "Members" on the left or you can email Carolyn at dis6000admin@Lisco.com to register or call 877-976-8279. Check back for the agenda which will be posted in the near future.

Sep 22, 2016 5:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Shive-Hattery, Inc.
4125 Westown Parkway
West Des Moines, IA  50266
United States

 

ONE ROTARY SUMMIT 2016-08-10 05:00:00Z 0

Rotary International has a host of newsletters to help you stay current on the topics that interest you most. Anyone can subscribe once they create an account and sign in.

To get started as a new subscriber, or to make changes to your existing subscriptions visit the Rotary International website at 

https://www.rotary.org/myrotary/en/news-features/newsletters  Then click the Manage Subscriptions button.

 

END POLIO NOW

An update about Rotary’s polio eradication efforts that includes inspiring stories and the latest statistics.

GIVING & GRANTS 

Information to help you support Rotary's work through contributions and grant-funded activities. 

MEMBERSHIP MINUTE

Rotary stories and the latest membership development ideas, strategies, and resources.

PEACE IN ACTION

A forum for the Rotary Peace Centers community.

RECONNECT

News about Rotary alumni.

ROTARY CONVENTION 

News, updates, and deadline information about Rotary's annual convention.

ROTARY LEADER

Practical information to help club and district leaders achieve success.

ROTARY SERVICE 

Information to help Rotary members plan effective and inspired service projects.

ROTARY WEEKLY

An update on news and information for Rotary members, as well as developments from around the Rotary world.

ROTARY YOUTH EXCHANGE 

Information and updates on current Youth Exchange events and resources.

THE ROTARIAN NEWSLETTER

Highlights from this month's issue of The Rotarian magazine.

TRAINING TALK

The latest RI training news, including RI mailings, RI Board decisions that affect training, and training tips.

VISIONS

Information about the benefits of charitable estate and financial planning. Primarily intended for a U.S. audience.

VOCATIONAL SERVICE 

News and resources related to vocational service.

YOUNG LEADERS IN ACTION

News and developments about Rotary's youth and young adult programs: Interact, Rotaract, and RYLA.

Rotary International Newsletters. 2016-07-26 05:00:00Z 0
Our Club's Leadership has taken on the task of creating a Rotary INTERACT Club at the Indianola High School.  Discussions with school officials have been very positive, with one counselor indicating a desire to be the Club's supervisor.  Dave T., Drew G., and Ron H. have all joined together to make this happen.  If you are interested in helping form the INTERACT Club please speak to one of our leaders to see how your talents can help our youth.
 
Below is information found on the RI website.  Click here to learn more.

WHAT IS INTERACT?

Interact is a club for youth ages 12-18 who want to connect with other young people in their community or school. Interact club members have fun while carrying out service projects and learning about the world. Interact clubs organize at least two service projects a year: one that benefits their community and one that encourages international understanding.

While Rotary clubs sponsor them, Interact clubs are largely self-sustaining, requiring little or no financial support from your club.

HOW DO I SPONSOR A CLUB?

Once your club has decided to sponsor an Interact club, form an Interact committee to organize and support the Interact club. Refer to the Interact Guide for Rotary Club Sponsors and Advisers for complete details.

Before starting the club:

  • Determine the need for an Interact club in your community
  • Identify a school or community partner
  • Locate possible Interactors such as current and past participants of Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) and Rotary Youth Exchange
  • Organize an informational meeting for potential members
  • Assign a Rotarian adviser who will attend board meetings of school-based clubs and all meetings of community-based clubs
  • For school-based clubs, identify a faculty adviser who will serve as the liaison between the sponsor Rotary club and the school administration
INTERACT At Indianola High School 2016-07-20 05:00:00Z 0

Over 240 High School Juniors and Seniors from across Iowa participated in Rotary Leadership Training (RYLA) on the Grinnell College campus this week  Rotary leaders and volunteers were on hand to guide and assist students as they learned and developed leadership skills during this life changing experience.  To learn about RYLA, click HERE

Our Club sent four students again this year.  We look forward to hearing of their experience in the near future.

2016 RYLA 2016-07-19 05:00:00Z 0

K.R. RAVINDRAN

PRESIDENT 2015-16

Many years ago, in Kolkata, India, I had the chance to meet Mother Teresa. She was an incredible woman with an incredible force of personality. When she walked down the street, the crowd parted in front of her like the Red Sea. Yet when you talked to her, if you mentioned the tremendous things she had done, she almost did not engage in this topic at all. By many reports, if you asked her what her greatest achievement was, she would answer, "I am an expert in cleaning toilets."
 
The answer was both humorous and absolutely serious. Her business was caring for others. Toilets had to be cleaned, so she cleaned them. There was no question of a job being beneath her. Helping people who needed help was her work, and there was nothing higher, nothing in the world more important than that.
 
So one day, when an elegantly dressed man came to Kolkata looking for Mother Teresa, the nuns who answered the door informed him that she was at the back of the house, cleaning the toilets. They pointed the way, and indeed he found Mother Teresa scrubbing the toilets. She said hello, assumed he was there to volunteer, and began explaining to him how to hold the toilet brush correctly and how not to waste water. Then she put the brush in his hand and left him standing there, in his expensive suit, alone in the lavatory.
 
Later, the man came out, found Mother Teresa again, and said, "I have finished; may I speak with you now?" "Yes, certainly," she said. He took an envelope out of his pocket and said, "Mother Teresa, I am the director of the airline, and here are your tickets. I just wanted to bring them to you personally."
 
That airline director told that story again and again for the rest of his life. He said those 20 minutes spent cleaning toilets had filled him with the greatest joy he had ever known – because by putting his hands to Mother Teresa's work, he became part of that work. For those 20 minutes, he cared for the sick just as she did: with his own hands, his own sweat.
 
That is exactly the opportunity that Rotary gives us. We might not do what Mother Teresa did – give up our lives, our homes, our families. But for 20 minutes, 20 hours, 20 days of the year, we can be like her.
 
We can do the work that others will not with our hands, and our hearts, and our sweat, and our devotion – knowing that what we do is the most important work in the world.
RI President's April Message 2016-04-13 05:00:00Z 0
 
 For more information about our club you can contact us at: indianolarotary@gmail.com 
Club Contact Terry Pauling 2016-04-06 05:00:00Z 0
 
 
Tom Narak of the Rotary Club of West Des Moines was selected by the District Nominating Team as District Governor 2018-19 and the announcement was made at the District Annual Business Meeting this March.
 
Tom's background is in Education.  Tom and his wife Carol are active in many aspects of Rotary, the Xicotepec Project for example.  They make their home in West Des Moines.
 
Congratulations Tom.
 
District Governor 2018-19 2016-04-06 05:00:00Z 0

Iowa M.O.S.T. was created to promote and organize the efforts of District 6000 Rotarians and non-Rotary medical personnel to work with the Rotarians of Huehuetenango, Guatemala, to provide free cleft lip/palate surgery.  This team also works to promote additional health related outreach identified in their community.

Trip dates are usually in February; to apply visit their website  at http://www.iowamost.org/ 

For more information contact:

Deb Dunkhase - Co-Chair and Team Leader         ddunkhase@theicm.org 
Gary Pacha - Co-Chair                                        gpacha@aol.com

Peter Wallace - Secretary                                    pdartwallace@gmail.com

Kyle Galloway - Treasurer

John Canady - Medical Director
Bill Olin - Emeritus VP                                        w.olin@mchsi.com

 

Contributions of any size from individuals and clubs will help to continue these missions.  Iowa MOST contributions are tax deductible. It is important that checks be made out to District 6000 HEF, with  Iowa MOST on the memo line.  

Please mail to:

Kyle Galloway-Iowa M.O.S.T. Treasurer 
2839 Brookside Drive
Iowa City, IA 52245

Iowa M.O.S.T. (Miles of Smiles Team) 2016-04-06 05:00:00Z 0
On March 21st students and staff from Simpson College, Rotaract at Simpson and Rotary Club of Indianola joined to package meals for Meals From The Heartland.  The first shift began at 6:00 p.m. and by 7:10 p.m. a total of 21,000 meals had been packaged.  A second shift began at 7:30 p.m. and another 20,000 meals were package, boxed and loaded into the truck for distribution in our country and around the world.
 
Thank you to Everyone who planned the event and to everyone who participated. The event brings home the fact that so many people in our world go hungry on a daily basis. Our help will alleviate that hunger at least for a day for some people. It was an honor to be asked to help and to participate.  Terry
 
   
  
 
Meals From The Heartland 2016-03-30 05:00:00Z 0
Regional leaders from around the globe gathered at Rotary World Headquarters in Evanston in early March for training they will use to inspire members in their respective areas.
 
Several participants - most of whom will begin their term on 1 July - noted that the true measure of the institute's success will be how well the information they learned is transmitted to Rotary members.
"We have to realize that training doesn't stop at the district level," said Michael Boyer, a Rotary public image coordinator from Pismo Beach, California, USA. "We train people really well to be governors and club presidents but we have to realize that we also have to train our members in how to talk about Rotary."  Boyer said his goal is to ensure that members can discuss Rotary's brand in a clear and compelling way. "We have to make our club presidents understand they can't just stand in front of their club and say, 'Go invite members.' They actually have to train members in how to ask and what to say," he said
 
A major goal of the four-day regional leaders training institute was to equip these leaders -- regional Rotary Foundation coordinators, Rotary coordinators, Rotary public image coordinators, and endowment/major gifts advisers -- to help club and district leaders strengthen club membership, focus and foster Rotary's humanitarian service, and enhance the organization's public image.
Many participants were impressed to learn about new tools available on Rotary.org, which they practiced using during multiple workshops.
 
"I have used Rotary.org for years but I have realized these past couple of days how much more advanced it has become," said Alasdair Seale, an endowment/major gifts adviser from Edinburgh, Scotland. "I didn't realize, for example, that there are alumni reports that include Group Student Exchange students, vocational training teams, Ambassadorial Scholars, and Rotaractors. They are all clearly a target for membership."
 
Patrick Coleman, a regional Rotary Foundation coordinator from Luanshya, Zambia, said members need to be encouraged to use Rotary.org.  "(What we are learning) is very exciting because we are bringing Rotary into the 21st century," Coleman said. "We have members who brag about being born before the age of computers. But that's a bit like saying, 'I was born before cellphones so I am not going to use one.' We're here, we need to use these tools."
 
Sherri Muniz, a Rotary coordinator from San Antonio, Texas, said the value of the institute for her was being able to share ideas.  "The program itself is designed to teach us teamwork," Muniz said. "But we are building connections with people who have success stories, with people who have similar challenges, and those connections will last us far beyond the end of the institute."
 
By Arnold R. Grahl
Rotary News
16-Mar-2016
INSTITUTE EQUIPS REGIONAL LEADERS TO ADVANCE ROTARY’S STORY 2016-03-17 05:00:00Z 0
      
Of the things we think, say or do
  1. Is it the TRUTH?
  2. Is it FAIR to all concerned?
  3. Will it build GOODWILL and BETTER FRIENDSHIPS?
  4. Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?
4-Way Test- 2016-03-09 06:00:00Z 0
The mission of The Rotary Foundation is to enable Rotarians to advance world understanding, goodwill, and peace through the improvement of health, the support of education, and the alleviation of poverty.  
The Rotary Foundation helps fund our humanitarian activities, from local service projects to global initiatives. Your club or district can apply for grants from the Foundation to invest in projects and provide scholarships. The Foundation also leads the charge on worldwide Rotary campaigns such as eradicating polio and promoting peace. Rotarians and friends of Rotary support the Foundation’s work through voluntary contributions.  Below you will find a list of ways you can support the Rotary Foundation.
 

RECURRING GIVING (ROTARY DIRECT)

Support our efforts year round by making a recurring gift. You choose how much and how often you want to give— it's a simple and secure way to make a big impact.

Online contributions can be made monthly, quarterly, or annually. If you prefer, you may return the completed Rotary Direct enrollment form or enroll by phone at +1-866-976-8279.

To update your existing recurring giving, contact us at rotary direct@rotary.org or call +1-866-976-8279. For security reasons, changes to your credit card information should be made by phone.

CHECK, DRAFT, OR WIRE PAYMENTS

Learn how to donate by different payment methods.

  • Securities
  • Planned Giving
  • Named Gift
  • Donor Advised Funds
  • Personal Property
  • Real Estate
  • Employee Matching Gift
  • Rotary Credit Card
  • Airline Miles

Resources and References

 

 

Rotary Foundation 2016-03-07 06:00:00Z 0
The Rotary Foundation has been improving lives since 1917.
Learn about our work and help us celebrate 100 years of doing good in the world.
 
 
Rotary Foundation set to Celebrate 100 years of helping others. 2016-01-26 06:00:00Z 0

Join Rotary International General Secretary John Hewko and Rotary staff members as they bike in El Tour de Tucson to raise funds for the fight to end polio.  

On 21 November, Rotary General Secretary John Hewko and a team of staffers will join Rotary members to bike up to 104 miles in El Tour de Tucson to raise funds for polio eradication. The event is one of the top cycling events in the U.S., attracting more than 9,000 cyclists each year. John and the Rotary team aim to raise $3.4 million, which will be tripled by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for a total of more than $10 million, for the fight to end polio. Make a contribution to help Rotary create a polio-free world.  Miles to End Polio

To Donate visit their website http://www.endpolio.org/miles-to-end-polio

El Tour de Tucson 2015-11-11 06:00:00Z 0
Rotary Club of Indianola celebrates its 93rd Anniversary this week.
Many Leaders of our Community have been Rotarians over those same years, providing expert guidance and improving our community for all to live, work and play.
 
A Toast to Rotary.    Champagne Glass Remix 3 by Merlin2525
Rotary Club of Indianola Celebrates Anniversary 2015-09-23 05:00:00Z 0

Simpson College debate team is an award-winning team that competes across the country. The team provides great opportunities to get involved on campus and meet new people. By joining the debate team, you will increase your public speaking abilities and ability to think quickly and creatively.  

Debate is a research and presentation process where students gather knowledge about competition topics, research to discover the pros and cons of the issue, then pick the best arguments to form a case.  In competition, two speakers will present their cases in a quick, intense and lively exchange to an audience and judges.  Judging is based on the persuasiveness of the speaker's arguments with awards going to the team or speaker who does the best at convincing the judges that their side is most correct.

Simpson College is currently the only college in Iowa and one of the first in the nation to offer public forum debate.  Click here to Visit their Debate website page.

Debate at Simpson College 2015-09-16 05:00:00Z 0

Carolina Gonzales Rivas, a scholarship recipient and member of the Rotary Club of Jaltemba-La Peñita, Mexico, talks about how Rotary has influenced her life.

When Mariana Day moved in 1989 to the small beach town of Chacala, in Nayarit, Mexico, she noticed that the surrounding rural areas struggled to maintain schools. And most children weren’t able to go beyond an eighth-grade education. Day, who is a member of the Rotary Club of Bahía de Jaltemba-La Peñita, in Nayarit, had started a local scholarship program before she joined Rotary. Called Changing Lives, the program provided students with high school tuition, uniforms, school supplies, and transportation.
 
In addition, Rotary clubs from the United States and Mexico have been investing in the education of children in Nayarit since 2003, providing scholarships and libraries and rehabbing school buildings.  The lasting impact in the region is apparent. 
 
“I think the combination of the scholarship program and Rotary’s interaction with the schools has made things seem possible, has changed the climate of education here, and the way the people think about education,” Day says.
 
One example of Rotary’s impact is Carolina Gonzales Rivas. She was able to attend high school thanks to Day’s scholarship program. Rivas is currently working on her master’s degree and has recently joined the Rotary Club of Jaltemba-La Peñita.   “I think that what Rotary is doing by supporting education and supporting students is to have a vision for life, to have aspirations – that’s what is going to change the world,” Rivas says. 
 
The Rotary Club of Berkeley, in California, USA, along with the Bahia de Jaltemba-La Peñita club and other North American clubs, recently tackled their largest project to date: a monthlong renovation of La Preparatoria 20 de Noviembre , a high school in the village of Las Varas. Funding came from a Rotary Foundation global grant and the financial contributions of six Rotary districts covering the 25 Rotary clubs that participated.
 
A total of 90 volunteers including the school’s teachers, students, and students’ parents, improved the old buildings and built three laboratory classrooms. All three feature new equipment and technology and can be used by local residents as well as students.
 
Eduardo Dominguez, a member of the Bahía de Jaltemba-La Peñita club, says one of the biggest rewards of these efforts is the fact that a college education is now a real possibility for local students.
 
“There are many young people in Mexico with huge potential and with much to give, as long as they are given an opportunity,” Dominguez says. “Rotarians are helping those opportunities to occur, for [these young people] to become contributors to their communities.”
 
By Daniela Garcia
Rotary News
26-Aug-2015
BRINGING EDUCATION TO RURAL MEXICAN AREA, ONE SCHOOL AT A TIME 2015-08-26 05:00:00Z 0
 
The 2015 National Balloon Classic is almost completed. Our community received the most rain in recent memory during the Classic's nine day event on Tuesday evening. The spectator parking area was dry enough by 4 p.m. on Wednesday to allow visitors to park in almost the entire field.  
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
  
 
         
 
 
 
 
 
 
 A.great crowd was present on an almost perfect evening.   
National Balloon Classic 2015-07-30 05:00:00Z 0

 

Rotarians participating in a meeting.
Rotary leaders from 13 countries met to discuss governmental funding for polio eradication during a Polio Advocacy Seminar in Evanston, Illinois, USA.

Whether you’re new to Rotary or a longtime member looking for ways to get more involved in your club or district, we have information and resources to help you achieve your goals.   

Rotary Club Leadership Roles 2015-06-09 05:00:00Z 0

ARE YOU A STUDENT OR YOUNG PROFESSIONAL LOOKING TO GROW YOUR LEADERSHIP SKILLS?

We have clubs and programs that can help you increase these skills, gain world understanding, and make lifelong friendships—all while making a real difference in your community.
  • Rotaract is for emerging leaders ages 18–30 who want to develop their professional and leadership skills while helping others.
  • Interact is for students ages 12–18 who have an interest in community service and global exchange. Interact clubs are often affiliated with a local school.
  • Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) is a leadership training program for young people, run by local clubs.
Visit Rotary International for more information about Rotary and growing your leadership skills.
 
LEADERSHIP SKILLS 2015-06-02 05:00:00Z 0
Gerald Konglan and David Fox, Ames Rotary, will be our guests to tell us about the Tanzania Water Project.
 
This Week's Program Terry Pauling 2015-05-20 05:00:00Z 0

Below is a follow-up report:

In October 2014 a Rotary Humanitarian Grant was approved to establish an operational water supply and delivery system for Kigogo Sub-Village in Tanzania.   

Currently the village of 1500 residents has no local source of water or electricity.  In the next year the deep well and delivery system will be built; electricity brought to the village;  villagers and the village water committee will be educated to ensure water sustainability; and impact assessments will be done on a timetable to determine if the lives of the villagers have improved through access to clean, safe water.

 A consortium of ten U.S. Rotary Clubs and third party donors united with the Rotary Club of Same, Tanzania (Host Club) for this cause.  In District 6000 the Clubs are: Rotary Club of Ames, Rotary Club of Ames- Morning, Rotary Club of Des Moines, Rotary Club of Grinnell, Rotary Club of Indianola, Rotary Club of Newton and Rotary Club of Pella.  There are three clubs outside District 6000 as well: Rotary Club of Webster City, Iowa (District 5970), Rotary Club of Hudson, Wisconsin (District 5960) and Rotary Club of South Pasadena, California (District 5300).   Third party donors were Hy-Vee, Inc. and Rewerts Well Drilling.   Several Rotarians of District 6000 gave personal donations.

Since the grant approval, well bore holes have been dug.  The exact site for the water well has not yet been finalized by Same District Water Engineer.   The Rotary Club of Same will also be hiring a Project Manager in the immediate future.   Once these are in place contracts can be bid and let for the project.  Plans are for monthly reports to come from the project.

The Rotary Club of Same, Tanzania is deeply grateful.  This will be an exciting time for Rotarians in the United States and Tanzania.

Mary Wells, Grant Communicator, Rotary Club of Ames 

$250,000 Humanitarian Grant approved by the Rotary Foundation 2015-03-03 00:00:00Z 0

Former Rotary President Clem Renouf recalls conversations with Rotary leaders as the organization turned its attention to eradicating polio.

Visit Rotary International to learn more of this Historic event.

PolioPlus Turns 30 2015-02-19 00:00:00Z 0
Posted on Feb 18, 2015

Rotary Peace Fellows are helping refugees start over.

Click here to read more in the Rotarian Magazine.

 

Voices For Peace from Rotary International on Vimeo.

 

 
Voices For Peace 2015-02-19 00:00:00Z 0

February 2015

World Understanding Month

The month of February is very special in the Rotary calendar since it is designated World Understanding Month. The month also includes the anniversary of the first meeting of Rotary held on February 23, 1905, now designated World Understanding and Peace Day.

In designating World Understanding Month, the Rotary International board asks all Rotary clubs to plan programs for their weekly meetings and undertake special activities to emphasize “understanding and goodwill as essential for world peace.”

To observe this designated month, many clubs arrange international speakers, invite youth exchange students and international scholars from schools and universities to club meetings, plan programs featuring former Group Study Exchange team members, arrange discussions on international issues, present entertainment with an international cultural or artistic theme and schedule other programs with an international emphasis.

Many clubs take the opportunity to launch an international community service activity or make contact with a Rotary club in another country. It is a good month to initiate a Rotary Fellowship Exchange, encourage support for PolioPlus and other Rotary Foundation programs.

World Understanding Month is a chance for every club to pause, plan and promote the Fourth Avenue of Service-Rotary’s continued quest for goodwill, peace and understanding among people of the world.

World Understanding Month 2015-02-11 00:00:00Z 0
Actress and Rotary polio ambassador Archie Panjabi immunizes children against polio in India 2014-12-17 00:00:00Z 0
Our Story 2014-10-29 00:00:00Z 0
Rotary Youth Exchange Pumpkin Fest
The RYE Pumpkin Fest was last Saturday at the Warren County Historical Center.
 
There were 9 RYE students, plus Rotex, Rotaract and District Counselors in attendance.
Thanks to Ron and Drew for arranging all the details.
 
A beautiful day with some creative students.
Who said Rotary was not fun?
 
Rotary Youth Exchange Pumpkin Fest 2014-10-21 00:00:00Z 0
Below is an e-mail response from RI Global Grants Committee to the Rotary Club of Ames about the possible approval of the Same Tanzania water project.
____________________________________________________

Rotary Club of Ames World Service and Global Grants Committee,

Early this afternoon I had a very productive telephone discussion with Rebeca Mendoza, our Regional Grants Officer in Evanston for the Kigogo Water Development Project.

She informed me that the responses we sent from both the Primary Host Sponsor (Rotary Club of Same) and the Primary International Host Sponsor (Rotary Club of Ames) have done a very good job in answering the questions that had been generated by reviewers in Evanston. They are ready to approve the grant. BUT!!!

She also informed me that the “stewardship” office had not yet completed their “technical” review of our grant; but would complete it by this Friday October 10. See Rebeca’s afternoon email below. I have yet to understand what the “technical” review by the “stewardship” office looks at!! We may learn by Friday or Monday as we continue to try to understand the Global Grant “black box” decision making process and actors in the process of the Rotary Foundation in Evanston!

Gerald

Same Water Project Update 2014-10-08 00:00:00Z 0
Below is an aerial photo of the parking area on Wednesday July 30, 2014.
Rotarians continued to park cars for almost an hour after this picture was taken.

National Balloon Classic 2014 2014-08-07 00:00:00Z 0

Rotary Foundation Chair Dong Kurn Lee talks about the Foundation’s accomplishments during the third plenary session on 3 June.

Photo Credit: Rotary International/Monika Lozinska

If progress is measured in numbers, Rotary has entered rarified air in the fight against polio. Eighty percent of the world is now certified polio free, and two of the three strains of the disease have been eradicated, according to , who heads the polio eradication program at the World Health Organization.

Still, major challenges remain, including the  of the disease, the insecurity in endemic countries, and geopolitical tensions. In May WHO declared polio a public health emergency, asking the world to step up its vaccination efforts for international travelers.

"The world has decided it will do everything possible to protect the progress of PolioPlus," said Alyward, who traveled from Switzerland to Australia to deliver Monday's keynote address. In Somalia, for example, hundreds of sites have been set up to vaccinate anyone attempting to enter or travel outside the country. Six months after setting up those sites, not one child had been reported polio stricken, Alyward added.

To read the rest of the story please visit this link:  Eighty Percent of World Polio Free

EIGHTY PERCENT OF THE WORLD POLIO FREE, TWO OF THREE STRAINS ERADICATED 2014-07-31 00:00:00Z 0
 
On July 25th, Rotary Club of Indianola Honored members of the club and community with Paul Harris Fellow Awards.

 
Top:  Pat, Drew and Amy
Lower: Pat, Drew and Bob G.
2014 Paul Harris Fellow Honorees 2014-07-30 00:00:00Z 0

MAY 2014

I've had a unique opportunity to be a part of the polio eradication campaign from its very beginnings, more than a quarter century ago, to where we are now, which is truly "this close" to the end.

None of us knew back then how long eradication would take, or how many obstacles we'd meet along the way. I'm not sure how we would have felt about taking on the challenge if we had known. But there is one thing I know for sure: that every single day of the last 29 years has been worth it. Because over those years, we have saved millions of children from being paralyzed by polio. There's no way to put a price tag on that. And today, we are closer than ever to a world in which no child will be paralyzed, ever again.

It's been a long race to the finish line. That line is now in sight. But we'll only cross it if we keep moving forward. And the only way to do that is with the help of every single Rotarian, everywhere in the world.

The first thing we need is your voice, and your advocacy. Think ahead to World Polio Day, on 24 October: What can your club and district do to raise awareness? Write letters to your elected officials, hold a purple pinkie fundraiser, plan an event with a local school. If you or someone you know has a story to tell about polio, share it at www.endpolionow.org/stories. The most important thing is to keep the momentum going. Let your community, and the world, know that the fight against polio is at its most critical stage yet.

I'm glad to report that the End Polio Now – Make History Today campaign is going well. Rotary met the terms of the new agreement with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and received US$70 million in matching funds in January, which will be fully committed in this calendar year. We have four more years of this agreement remaining, during which the Gates Foundation will match two-to-one every dollar Rotary spends on polio, to a maximum of $35 million per year. I encourage all of you to do what you can to help us make the most of this opportunity. I know that together, we can engage Rotary to end polio – and change the world, forever.

RON D. BURTON

PRESIDENT 2013-14

Presdent's May Message 2014-05-28 00:00:00Z 0
 
 
3rd Annual
Rotary Ride Across Warren County
The Night Ride
'Indianola's Other Bike Night'
3rd Annual Rotary Ride Across Warren County 2014-05-14 00:00:00Z 0
22-Apr-2014

DELFT, The Netherlands (24 April 2014) — The first class of five Rotary sponsored scholars has graduated with Master of Science degrees in water education from the UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education. The graduates now will apply their education to water and sanitation projects in their home countries of Argentina, Uganda, Nigeria, Ethiopia and Ghana.

Established in 2011, the partnership between Rotary and UNESCO-IHE -- the world’s largest graduate water education facility -- addresses the global water and sanitation crisis by increasing the ranks of trained professionals critically needed to devise, plan and implement solutions in countries where communities lack access to clean water and safe sanitation.  Rotary provides scholarship grants that enable local Rotary clubs and districts to select and sponsor eligible students to the program. Rotary members mentor the students throughout the program, building positive relationships that continue after graduation.

“We’re proud of the Rotary and UNESCO-IHE partnership and especially proud of our first class of Rotary water scholars, who will now use their expertise to develop sustainable water and sanitation solutions in their home countries,” said Rotary Foundation Trustee Stephen R. Brown. “The mentoring of the students by Rotary clubs and Rotary members – during their studies at UNESCO-IHE, as well as after they return home – is essential to the success of the scholarship program. These relationships and networks will enable students to effectively implement their skills in their own local communities. Their work to improve water and sanitation conditions will have a positive, lasting impact around the world.”

Click here to read the rest of the announcement.

 

ROTARY, UNESCO-IHE ANNOUNCE NEW GRADUATING CLASS AIMS TO IMPROVE WATER AND SANITATION 2014-04-30 00:00:00Z 0

APRIL 2014

Like attending a Rotary club meeting, reading Rotary magazines is an essential part of the shared experience of being a Rotarian. When you pick up a Rotary publication, whether it's Rotary Down Under in Australia and New Zealand, or The Rotary-No-Tomo in Japan, you'll find that every single one does just what it's meant to do: It informs, and it inspires. It keeps you up to date with Rotary news, brings you new ideas for your Rotary service, and tells stories that are relevant and meaningful to you. To me, these publications around the world are a tangible representation of Rotary's greatest strength: that each club is a local, community-based entity, engaged in a truly global network.

This organization is incredibly large and diverse, and as much as we all have in common in Rotary, we are not a place where one size fits all. Our expectations of a magazine, both culturally and linguistically, are naturally going to be different. With our regional publications, Rotarians in Bulgaria can find out what's going on in Rotary in Bulgaria, and what's going on elsewhere in the Rotary world, along with the latest news from Evanston. Because each one of our Rotary publications belongs to the family of Rotary magazines – each one is, like every Rotary club, both fully local and fully part of our international identity.

One of the greatest privileges of being RI president is the ability to speak directly, every month, to every one of our 1.2 million Rotarians. It's awe-inspiring to me, as I write this, to think of all of you, sitting down in your living rooms or at the breakfast table or maybe on the train to work, reading these words, and then turning the page to find out what's new in Rotary. And overwhelmingly, that is exactly what each of you does. Not just because your Rotary magazine turns up in the mailbox, or because you feel you have to – but because Rotary magazines are good magazines. I hope that when you pick up your publication – whichever one you're reading right now – you get the same feeling of pride, and ambition, that I do.

Rotary magazines remind us that as Rotarians, we are all part of something larger than ourselves. They show us just how much we can achieve through Rotary. Through them, we see what our Foundation dollars do, we see what our fellow Rotarians are doing, and we are inspired to Engage Rotary, Change Lives even more.

RON D. BURTON

PRESIDENT 2013-14

Presdent's April Message 2014-04-03 00:00:00Z 0

HISTORY

 

Paul Harris

“WHATEVER ROTARY MAY MEAN TO US, TO THE WORLD IT WILL BE KNOWN BY THE RESULTS IT ACHIEVES.”

—PAUL P. HARRIS

Our 1.2 million-member organization started with the vision of one man—Paul P. Harris. The Chicago attorney formed one of the world’s first service organizations, the Rotary Club of Chicago, on 23 February 1905 as a place where professionals with diverse backgrounds could exchange ideas and form meaningful, lifelong friendships. Rotary’s name came from the group’s early practice of rotating meetings among the offices of each member.

OUR ONGOING COMMITMENT

Rotarians have not only been present for major events in history—we’ve been a part of them. From the beginning, three key traits have remained strong throughout Rotary:

We’re truly international. Only 16 years after being founded, Rotary had clubs on six continents. Today we’re working together from around the globe both digitally and in-person to solve some of our world’s most challenging problems.

We persevere in tough times. During WWII, Rotary clubs in Germany, Austria, Italy, Spain, and Japan were forced to disband. Despite the risks, many continued to meet informally and following the war’s end, Rotary members joined together to rebuild their clubs and their countries.

Our commitment to service is ongoing. We began our fight against polio in 1979 with a project to immunize 6 million children in the Philippines. By 2012, only three countries remain polio-endemic—down from 125 in 1988.

Rotary International

HISTORY 2014-02-20 00:00:00Z 0
By Dan Nixon

Rotary News

13-JAN-2014

Throughout India and around the world, Rotary clubs are celebrating a major milestone: India has gone three years without a new case of polio. The last reported case was a two-year-old girl in West Bengal on 13 January 2011.

To mark this historic triumph -- reached after a decades-long battle against polio -- Rotary clubs illuminated landmarks and iconic structures throughout the country with four simple but powerful words, "India is polio free."

Visit the Rotary International website to read more about the astonishing accomplishment.

INDIA CELEBRATES THREE YEARS WITHOUT POLIO 2014-01-22 00:00:00Z 0
 
The collective leadership and expertise of our 1.2 million members helps us tackle some of the world’s biggest challenges, locally and globally. We are united by common values and vision for the future as we sharpen our focus with targeted specific causes that will reach communities most in need.
 

GUIDING PRINCIPLES

For more than 100 years, our guiding principles have been the foundation upon which our values and tradition stand. The Four-Way Test, Object of Rotary, and the Avenues of Service express our commitment to service, fellowship, diversity, integrity, and leadership.

Learn more

STRATEGIC PLAN

Rotary’s strategic plan ensures that our future is as strong as our past. The plan unifies the direction of Rotary International and The Rotary Foundation and identifies three strategic priorities supported by 16 goals.

Learn more

AREAS OF FOCUS

We direct our efforts in six areas to enhance our local and global impact. Our most successful and sustainable projects and activities tend to fall within the following areas:

  • Promoting peace
  • Fighting disease
  • Providing clean water
  • Saving mothers and children
  • Supporting education
  • Growing local economies

Learn more

ROTARY'S PRIORITIES 2014-01-08 00:00:00Z 0
Posted by Terry Pauling on Jan 07, 2014
January Board Meeting Summary
 
The Board met this past Wednesday with the following items of consideration.
1. The Board approved sponsorship of 2 - Students to RYLA in 2014.  
2. Tim and Terry are close to updating the website with pictures of our menbers.
3.  Jennifer provided a WCLI update for the Summerset Trail improvements.  Warren County Conservation Board moved implementation of the improvements to spring 2014.
4. An Rotary Youth Exchange committee meeting is scheduled for Jan. 9th at the Brickhouse, beginning at 5:30 p.m.
5.  A motion to spend $400 as a gift to the Staff at the Country Club for their willingness and great work meeting our needs in 2013.
6. Simpson College will be contacted to obtain the names of Warren County students who are in need of financial aid. A Sophmore Student will be selected to receive a $500 scholarship for their Sophomore, Junior & Senior years at Simpson.
7. Members will be asked to review their name tags and let Arlen know if it needs to be updated.
 
 
January Board Meeting Terry Pauling 2014-01-08 00:00:00Z 0
The mission of The Rotary Foundation is to support the efforts of Rotarians as they strive to assist Rotary International in the fulfillment of the Object of Rotary and Rotary's mission.  That mission is the achievement of world understanding and peace through local, national and international humanitarian, educational, and cultural programs.
 
The Rotary Foundation was started in 1917 by Rotary International's sixth president, Arch C. Klumph.  The first donation was $26.50, the profit from the International Convention held in Kansas City, Missouri. It has grown with annual contributions totaling more than US$111.9 million, the amount contributed in 2005-06. The Rotary Foundation is a not-for-profit corporation that is supported solely by voluntary contributions from Rotarians and friends of the Foundation who share its vision of a better world.
 
The Rotary Foundation consists of three funds, which accept contributions from Rotarians. Click on a fund to learn its purpose.
To learn more about the Rotary Foundation please visit their website:   Rotary Foundation District 6000 
 
Why "Every Rotarian, Every Year?"
 
What happens to our contributions?
The 2004 Rotary International Council on Legislation unanimously adopted the concept of asking each of the 1.2 million Rotarians of the world to contribute at least $100 per year to The Rotary Foundation Annual Programs Fund.  If Rotarians reach that goal, the good that could be done in the world would be tremendous.
What happens to these funds?  The Rotary Foundation invests one hundred percent of the contributions for three years.  Then fifty percent of the contributions from District 6000 Rotarians are returned to District 6000 for Humanitarian or Educational activities sponsored by District 6000 and the District's Rotary Clubs. The District Governor and the leadership are responsible for allocating these funds to approved Rotary International educational and humanitarian programs.
 
Educational Programs:
With the dollars returned to District 6000, our District leadership has selected and funded three Ambassadorial Scholars to study abroad for one year for many years.  The scholars receive a grant of $23,000 to study abroad at a College or University of their choice for one year.
 
Humanitarian Programs:
 
Matching Grants
Many District 6000 Rotary Clubs become involved with a Rotary Club in a foreign country to improve the lives of individuals in their country through matching grants.  The Rotary Foundation Matching Grants is a system where Rotary Club Contributions are matched by funds from the District Funds, which are then matched, by available funds from The Rotary Foundation.  The International Rotary Club Partner usually has funds matched by their District and The Rotary Foundation.
District 6000 has been involved in 142 Matching Grants since 2001 totaling over $1.9 million.
 
District Simplified Grants:
District 6000 Rotary Clubs have the opportunity toundertaken community projects in their towns and cities to improve the lives of the members of their communities through District Simplified Grants.  During the 2005-06 Rotary year, 17 District 6000 Rotary Clubs received $38,000 for community projects, while during the 2006-07 Rotary year, $31,653 was allocated to 18 District 6000 Rotary Clubs.
 
How have we done?  Have we reached the $100 goal of giving to the Annual Programs Fund?
During the 2004-05 Rotary year, the Rotarians of District 6000 contributed an average of $96.60.  The Rotarians of D-6000 contributed an average of $96.43 during the 2005-06 to the Annual Programs Fund.  The 2007-08 goal was to exceed $100 per D-6000 Rotarian.  These goals can be met if each Rotarian will do their part!
District 6000 Rotarians support is critical to enable Rotary to continue to do service around our communities and in the world.  Realize that $100 per year is just 28¢ a day, or $1.92 a week.  There are not many Rotarians in District 6000 that cannot afford that level of support to The Rotary Foundation dedicated to improving their communities and the world.
The Rotary Foundation Terry Pauling 2014-01-01 00:00:00Z 0
PROJECT FAIR - JANUARY 30 THROUGH FEBRUARY 1, ANTIGUA, GUATEMALA Jim Peterson 2013-12-05 00:00:00Z 0
Thanks to our
donors, over 
18,255,644
children have received
a dictionary to date
2,397,306
dictionaries were given
to students in 2012
dictionaries were given
to students in 2012
Dictionary Project 2013-11-21 00:00:00Z 0

Of The Things we think, say or do 

1.  Is it the TRUTH?
2.  Is it FAIR to all concerned?
3.  Will it build GOODWILL and BETTER
     FRIENDSHIPS?
4.  Will it be BENEFICIAL to all
     Concerned?
4-Way Test-1 2013-11-20 00:00:00Z 0
World Polio Day 2013-10-23 00:00:00Z 0
Paul Harris and the Birth of Rotary 2013-10-10 00:00:00Z 0
Using Your Vocation To Mentor Students
Posted Oct. 3, 2013
By R. Scott Lyons, a member of the Rotary Club of Rappahannock-Fredericksburg, Virginia, USA 
Rotary Voices 2013-10-04 00:00:00Z 0
End Polio 2013-10-04 00:00:00Z 0

 
Thank you to all who helped with the Rotary Book Sale last weekend.
The task was made easy with so many hands helping make it a success.
 
A total of $1,650 was raised, after expenses, to be used for Dictionaries and the remainder to the Library for use in updating their inventory.
 
Thanks again Everyone!
Rotary Book Sale Terry Pauling 2013-10-01 00:00:00Z 0
 
A young man installs a solar panel on a thatched roof, which when connected to solar lights inside the hut, will extend the villagers’ day by three to four hours
COUPLE VENTURE OUTSIDE COMFORT ZONE TO BRING AID 2013-09-18 00:00:00Z 0
.

. Terry Pauling 2013-09-17 00:00:00Z 0

Why join Rotary?

Maybe you’ve seen a need in your own community and wondered how you could help. Maybe you want to use your professional skills to help others — or even learn new skills. Maybe you’re seeking connections with other service-minded professionals in your community or abroad.

Whatever your reason, joining Rotary can help you achieve these goals, and so much more. See why these men and women are members of their local Rotary club. Then learn how you can get involved.

 

Why Join Rotary? 2013-08-14 00:00:00Z 0
July 2013
 
Dear fellow Rotarians,
 
This is an incredibly exciting time to be a Rotarian. This Rotary year can be one of the greatest years we have yet experienced in Rotary – but it is up to each one of us. We are now writing the last chapter in our fight against polio. While it has been a long, hard journey, we have learned many valuable lessons. We have learned that as a group we can move mountains, we can change people’s lives for the better, and we can honestly make a difference in our world. Perhaps the greatest lesson has been that the more we challenge ourselves, the more we can achieve.
 
We are also embarking on a new chapter in the storied history of our Rotary Foundation. We have the rare privilege of launching an entirely new grant structure we’ve come to know as Future Vision. It gives us the opportunity to challenge ourselves to do the absolute most we can, with all of our resources. Just think how much more we can do with a stronger Foundation, with stronger clubs filled with more Rotarians who are fully engaged in Rotary service.
 
It’s time for us to recognize that the real challenge we face isn’t just bringing new members into Rotary. It’s turning all members into true Rotarians. It’s helping members get engaged in Rotary – helping them realize the potential they have, and how their Rotary service can change lives. We need to make sure that every member is active and contributing, and making a real difference – because when you’re doing meaningful work in Rotary, Rotary is meaningful to you.
 
When we realize what we can achieve in Rotary – when we really engage Rotary – that’s when lives change. We change the lives of the people who need us. That is inevitable. And along the way, our lives are changed as well. That is also inevitable. That’s what our theme is all about in 2013-14: Engage Rotary, Change Lives.
 
It’s time to open our eyes to the potential each of us has through Rotary. Rotary lets us reach higher, do more, and be a part of something larger than ourselves. No matter how much we give to Rotary, we get more in return. And that, too, is inevitable.
 
In 2013-14, let’s turn all of our potential into reality. It’s up to us. We can do it by engaging in Rotary service, by getting involved, by staying inspired, and by remembering every day the gift we have in Rotary. Together, we will Engage Rotary, Change Lives
 
Ron D. Burton 
President, Rotary International
RI President's July Message Terry Pauling 2013-07-02 00:00:00Z 0
District 6000 Newsletter
 
Visit the District Website to read the latest edition of the District NewsLetter.
Choose your ‘Hot Button’; Rotary offers ‘something for everyone!’ Terry Pauling 2013-06-20 00:00:00Z 0
Posted by Terry Pauling on Jan 07, 2013
A Rotary Make-Up meeting will be held the Third Wednesday morning of Each Month beginning at 7 a.m. at Crouse Cafe.
Time will be devoted to getting to know your fellow Rotary club members, discussing upcoming Rotary events, asking for ideas of how we can better serve our community and explaining Rotary to new members.
If you need to make up a missed meeting this will be a great way to interact with our club members.
See you on Wednesday Jan. 16th. at Crouse Cafe.
Rotary Make Up Terry Pauling 2013-01-08 00:00:00Z 0
Posted on Aug 30, 2011
What would it take to change the world? Rotary's 1.2 million members believe it starts with a commitment to Service Above Self.

In more than 34,000 clubs worldwide, you'll find members volunteering in communities at home and abroad to support education and job training, provide clean water, combat hunger, improve health and sanitation, and eradicate polio.

Explore this site to learn more about Rotary and how you can join your local Rotary club.

About Rotary 2011-08-31 00:00:00Z 0